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DEA Just Admitted It Lets Drugs Into Communities & Pushes Them on Citizens

DEA Just Admitted It Lets Drugs Into Communities & Pushes Them on Citizens

When Richard Nixon decided to bring the War on Drugs into full force, he signed Reorganization Plan No. 2, in 1973, which established the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). For decades, the DEA has carried out a war on people as it enforces the senseless, unjust prohibition of arbitrary substances.

Trump Gives Homeowners Limited Time to Claim… Sponsored by Finance Daily Read more Government ruins countless lives – locking people in cages for years or life, tearing apart families – for victimless “crimes” such as possessing cannabis or other “illicit” drugs. In a glaring example of hypocirsy, however, the DEA is teaching Americans a telling lesson —you’re not supposed to sell or possess substances that are deemed illegal by the State, unless you work for the State.

In a recent House Judiciary Committee Hearing, the DEA’s acting director, Chuck Rosenberg, was caught off-guard by a question and tacitly admitted that his agency sells drugs and lets drugs flow into communities. The ostensible purpose is to catch bigger drug dealers, but Rosenberg could not even summon the typical bureaucratic doublespeak to address the issue.

Louisiana Rep. Cedric L. Richmond was questioning Rosenberg at the hearing.

RICHMOND: This committee held many hearings, and was furious about the Fast and Furious program. At least from my knowledge of DEA and other drug agencies, oftentimes part of a bigger sting is letting transactions and other things go through. Now, it’s a very specific question. In DEA’s past, present, future, any times do you let drugs hit communities to get the bigger fish?

ROSENBERG: We’re not supposed to – no, sir.

RICHMOND: Okay. Are you aware of any instances where it may happen?

ROSENBERG: I’ll have to check and get back to you on that.

Rosenberg’s first answer was actually, “We’re not supposed to – no, sir.” However, this does not change the reality of the situation that DEA lets drugs flow into communities and actually sells drugs. Rosenberg didn’t deny it, because denying it would amount to lying.

As the Washington Post notes, DEA’s drug trafficking occurs through undercover agents and the use of confidential informants.

DEA catches small-time drug users or sellers and threatens jail and other punishments, unless the subject agrees to work for the government as a confidential informant. The DEA then has the frightened subjects engage in “otherwise illegal activity,” having them pose as buyers or sellers of drugs.

DEA is “trafficking in what would be considered as large quantities of controlled substances,” as a 2015 Dept. of Justice Inspector General report noted. That report also stated: “These inadequate DEA policies and procedures related to OIA greatly increase the risk to the DEA, the U.S. government, and the public from the involvement of DEA confidential sources in OIA.”

Indeed, the threat to the public is well documented, as some of those coerced into becoming informants end up murdered. In one heartbreaking case, Rachel Hoffman – a young college graduate whose “crime” was smoking pot – was shot and killed after cops coerced her into going undercover for a large drug deal.

No one really knows the scale of DEA drug trafficking, as the agency does not release this information, but outside experts say the DEA sells drugs on a routine basis.
Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/dea-drug-dealers-neighborhoods/#PiSDMK1bSkmUjIeX.99


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