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EU’s Juncker pressures ancillary states to not just join trade union but to also accept Euro as their primary currency

EU’s Juncker pressures ancillary states to not just join trade union but to also accept Euro as their primary currency

All appearances within the European Union are pointing to EC commissioner Jean-Claude Juncker wanting to turn Europe into one big superstate as the leading official is seeking to mandate that all ancillary countries who wish to join the coalition’s Schengen Zone (trade zone) must also accept the Euro as their primary currency.

Additionally on Sept. 13, Juncker called for the Union to create the office of a Minister of Finance and Economics that would be accountable only to the European Parliament.

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The chief of the European Commission proposed to create the post of a Europe-wide economy and finance minister to boost the eurozone. Moreover, Juncker suggested that states that are set to join the Schengen zone, are also “duty bound” to join the eurozone as well.

The eurozone needs a minister of economy and finance, accountable to the European Parliament, to promote structural reforms, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said Wednesday.

“We need a European minister of¬†economy and finance, a minister to¬†promote structural reforms in¬†our member states‚Ķ The European minister of¬†economy and finance must of¬†course be accountable to¬†the European Parliament, we do not need parallel structures, we do not need a separate EU budget,” Juncker said.

When speaking about¬†the upcoming inclusion of¬†Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia to¬†the Schengen¬†zone, Juncker said that “all but¬†two states are duty bound to¬†join the Euro area” as¬†well.

“These member states need the support of¬†a euro accession instrument,” the EU commission chief said.

Moreover, Juncker commented on¬†French President Emmanuel Macron’s proposal to¬†create a common eurozone budget, with¬†a permanent finance minister, and got Germany on¬†board with¬†this plan to¬†elaborate on¬†a road map for¬†the reform by¬†the end of¬†the year.

“Efficiency requires integrated instruments of¬†the eurozone management. We do not need a parallel structure, we do not need a separate budget for¬†the eurozone. We need a strong budget line for¬†the eurozone in¬†the framework of¬†the EU budget,” Juncker said.

Juncker, however, supported the idea of¬†appointing a pan-EU minister of¬†economy to¬†promote structural reforms, also voiced by¬†the French president. –¬†Sputnik News

Because of horrendous policies imposed by the EU over the past few years, including forced acceptance of Islamic refugees and the failure of the Troika to solve the financial struggles of nations in Southern Europe, more and more countries that previously desired to move into the EU fold are thinking twice about giving up their sovereignty to a group of bureaucrats who appear on the surface to only be wanting power for themselves to the detriment of the individual states.  And this new plan for a singular EU budget is only exacerbating this belief.

Europe is quickly falling behind to the rising coalitions of the BRICS, the SCO, and Eurasian Economic Union that have the power of 40% of the world’s economic and consumer populations. ¬†And while the EU does need major reforms if they want to be a player in the newly emerging financial order, it will not come by superseding the sovereignty of their member states because that is what has enticed economy after economy to move into China and Russia’s camp over the past seven years.

Kenneth Schortgen Jr is a writer for The Daily Economist, Secretsofthefed.com, Roguemoney.net, and Viral Liberty, and hosts the popular youtube podcast on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Ken can also be heard Wednesday afternoons giving an weekly economic report on the Angel Clark radio show.


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