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Fast food upstart Shake Shack’s new location will be partially run by robots, no longer accept cash

Fast food upstart Shake Shack’s new location will be partially run by robots, no longer accept cash

A Manhattan Shake Shack location is opening that will likely be a model for the future of fast food as the upstart restaurant is charting a course of automation that will include no longer accepting cash for payments.

In fact replacing cashiers with automated kiosks could be the first step in the creation of a virtually human free restaurant as customers can place their orders from automated screens or from a Smartphone App that will double as their payment ‘wallet’.

Illustration: Liu Rui/GT

A brand new Manhattan Shake Shack set to open its doors later this month in Astor Place will offer guests all the same great-tasting burgers, dogs and shakes as other locations but it will be missing one costly component that most other restaurants still depend on: cashiers.

As the¬†NY Post¬†points out today, Shake Shack will be using it’s newest location to test a fully automated ordering system that will allow customers to order at kiosks or via the company’s app and then pick up their food once they get a text.

Robots will replace humans and cash won’t be accepted at a soon-to-open Shake Shack in the East Village, reps for the popular burger chain said Monday.

Customers will place orders via an app and at touch-screen kiosks inside the restaurant, which is scheduled to open an Astor Place branch later this month, according to company CEO Randy Garutti.

Diners can also pay on smartphones and tablets using the restaurant‚Äôs app. –¬†Zerohedge

With many states and municipalities giving into the demand of unskilled workers to raise the minimum wage to $15.00 per hours, the added labor costs are now making it viable for these same workers to be replaced with machines, or automated kiosks that in the long run will save businesses thousands of dollars in productivity costs.

Similar to when the world went through a paradigm shift at the turn of the 20th century as pure human labor was replaced by assembly lines through the advent of electricity. lower skilled vocations are experiencing their next metamorphosis in the age of computers and robotics.  And this means that workers will need to adapt to the new age of jobs, or find themselves on the sidelines protesting for a future that will no longer exist.

Kenneth Schortgen Jr is a writer for The Daily Economist, Secretsofthefed.com, Roguemoney.net, and Viral Liberty, and hosts the popular youtube podcast on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Ken can also be heard Wednesday afternoons giving an weekly economic report on the Angel Clark radio show.


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